The facts about Google Mobile Services (GMS) in the Enterprise

GMS, what is it? How does it affect Android devices? Do you really need it? Chances are you’re reading this because those are all questions you have been asking yourself (either that or you’re subscribed to our newsletter). Over the next few blogs we aim to look at the history of the Android OS and break down its key areas to see how it compares against other operating systems. In this first part we will look at what GMS is and how it affects Android devices. We will also be looking at the facts about Google Mobile Services (GMS) in the Enterprise to help determine whether or not you really need it.

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Top 5 Mobile Stories of 2009

Top 5 Mobile Stories of 2009

Top 5 Mobile Stories of 2009

Cast your mind back five years Microsoft launched Windows 7 Barack Obama became US President and Avatar was the biggest grossing movie taking in $761m.

Things move very fast in mobility so lets take a look back at what were some of the top mobile stories of 2009.

 

“iSlate” Rumours

This was an era when nearly a quarter of all PC sales in Europe were made up of sub laptop devices called “Netbooks” sporting mini screens and tiny keyboards. Rumors were swirling that Apple intended to bring out a device called “iSlate” a consumer grade breakthrough tablet to sell alongside the iPhone and iPod. Many commentators decided this was never going to happen including this hilarious article from PC World

As we all know the iPad was released in April of 2010 and some 200m units later the rest is history…

Navigation for the Masses

At the time Apple limited users to expensive options from TomTom or CoPilot. When Google Launched Google Maps Navigation a whole new functional area was born. This enabled Android users to use navigation straight from their phones and thus consigned many dedicated GPS navigation units to car boot sales.

Smartphone Adoption and Dominant Player Meltdown

Early in 2009 if you had a “smartphone” it was probably a Blackberry who had 55% market share in the US 20% globally and strong financials. If you were still using a plain cell phone it was likely to have been a Nokia who at the time boasted 41% world wide share. Later in the year one survey figured that 39% of people had a smartphone Blackberry still accounting for the largest portion of U.S. market share with 50% followed by Apple at 30% Palm with 7% and Android around 3%.

Adoption is now well over 50% in most markets with rates in some counties breaking 80%. In 2017, IDC expects that 1.7 billion smartphones will be shipped.

You all know what became of Blackberry and Nokia…

Android Goes Mainstream

It took a while to get off the ground but 2009 was the year Android went mainstream. All of a sudden it was obvious that the iPhone was not the only cool handset with built in music social media and the ability to browse the web.

The Motorola Droid got a lot of headlines and was a bestseller in the US but HTC Samsung and Sony all had success with early versions of devices on Android platforms.

Market share of the Android OS is now thought to be @80% worldwide…

Battery Power

We take this increasingly for granted but the development of mobile devices has led to huge innovation in battery technology to drive such features as LTE, Wi-Fi, Video,  Cameras GPS and those huge bright screens.

In 2009 1500 a mAh battery was the industry’s high water mark yielding for many smartphone users a battery life of about 6 hours

At the launch of the Galaxy S5 earlier this year Samsung boasted of a 2,800 mAh battery that the company claims can deliver 11 hours of video playback or 10 hours of web browsing over LTE.

So what can we learn from the top mobile stories of 2009 ? Things change fast and innovation and good timing can often by key to the success of new products.  If you are into crystal ball gazing mobile technology it may be safe to make a prediction 12 months out but 3 to 5 years is much much more difficult.

Top 5 Mobile Stories of 2009Get in touch to learn more about our approach to building effective solutions for enterprise mobility. No crystal ball needed.