MobileWorxs add Seuic Android Handheld to Portfolio

MobileWorxs add Seuic Android Handheld to Portfolio

MobileWorxs add Seuic Android Handheld to Portfolio

When an enterprise has numerous mission-critical handheld devices deployed across their operation and a technology refresh is needed a change over strategy is key to a successful roll-out of the new devices so as not to cause disruptions in the supply chain. It is also important to ensure that mobile workers are familiar with the new technology and that any new software apps are thoroughly tested.

Many companies are considering replacing their aging Microsoft PDA based devices and migrating to Android across their supply chains before the Windows Mobile OS end of life deadline at the end of 2019.  MobileWorxs have added the Seuic Rugged Android Handheld and Tablet range to the product portfolio to give users  a viable replacement option that combines affordability, quality and reliability Seuic will be incorporated into our sales support and workshop capabilities.

China has the world’s largest manufacturing, e-commerce and logistics industries, and is also the largest market for barcode and RFID mobile computers. Seuic has high sales volume across 25 countries. As a result, we can benefit from the cost advantages of Seuic’s scalable production and help our users be more productive in their supply chain.

MobileWorxs will initially focus on three products with more to come soon. These include the Seuic Cruise 1, which is a rugged smartphone suitable for field service, delivery and store operations. The Autoid 9, a rugged key-based PDA, will be a great drop-in replacement for legacy Windows mobile users in the general, as well as logistics and manufacturing industries. The Autoid Pad is a small tablet with a horizontal focus across many industry sectors.

MobileWorxs add Seuic Android Handheld to Portfolio

Get in touch to see how we can assist by doing an audit of your Windows Mobile assets and preparing an easy-to-adopt Android migration path that is affordable to deploy across the entire supply chain.

Dealing With Microsoft Windows CE OS End of Life

Dealing With Microsoft Windows CE OS End of Life

One of the most important operating systems that at one time underpinned many enterprise mobility deployments is about to enter the last phase of its life. So how do you go about dealing with Microsoft Windows CE OS End of Life ?

Microsoft Windows CE OS End of Life

Long before iOS and Android Microsoft announced Windows CE in 1996. The OS was designed to operate satisfactorily on the small memory capacities of palm sized devices at the time. Although recognised by many as targeted at hand held computers many platforms ended up using derivatives of CE.

In the enterprise mobility market Windows CE, Windows Mobile, and Pocket PC are often used interchangeably this is in no doubt in part due to their common origin. This practice is not entirely accurate. You can read more about the history of Windows “CE” here.  and Windows “Mobile” here.

Windows CE Legacy

A roll call of key Windows CE based devices used in the enterprise would generate a blog post of epic length. These are three of our favourite devices that were sold in large quantities all across the world into a variety of application areas including Manufacturing T&L and Retail,

Symbol / Motorola MC9090

Intermec CN3

Symbol MC70

A faltering mobile OS business hurt Microsoft for many years, although popular in the enterprise due to high adoption market appropriate hardware and plentiful development tools. Versions of the OS for phones had been losing market share since 2007.

End of an Era Key Dates

These EoL dates have been trailed by Microsoft for some time.

Windows Embedded CE 6.0 went EoL in June of 2018
June 2019 – Windows Embedded 8.1 Handheld
January 2020 – Windows Embedded Handheld 6.5

So What Comes Next

For many users this will be something to discuss with their software vendor. The coming Microsoft Windows CE OS end of life may make little difference if the devices are working and no major system upgrades are planned. However patch support will cease and as hardware itself becomes EoL and developer resource dries up it will be time to move on to something else.  What that is very much depends on your circumstances, there is no one sized fits all approach. In a straight swap the main options for many sites are clearly Android a traditional rugged tablet on Windows 10 or a Microsoft Surface. Some may consider iOS but it has its drawbacks when it comes to device management.

Microsoft Windows CE OS End of Life Dealing With Microsoft Windows CE OS End of Life

Don’t let the Microsoft Windows CE OS End of Life get the better of your operation. Call us to discuss how we can help you weigh up the options and plan for the future.

How Mobile Devices Capture High Resolution Images

How Mobile Devices Capture High Resolution Images

A smartphone with a 16mp autofocus rear camera, 8mp front camera, and recording in 1080p or UHD 4K is becoming somewhat the norm. This is mainly on the case on the consumer side rather than enterprise, but the enterprise is following suit. A typical old school Windows Mobile MC67 for example has an 8MP rear camera.

Windows Mobile devices are somewhat limited here as the 32mb RAM allowance means large images and videos will probably crash the unit. This is where iOS, Android, Windows 8.1 or 10 for the Enterprise are key.

Giving the end user the ability to capture media in high resolution is a big plus point. Images of completed works, or videos problem areas can be highlighted in detail. But at what cost?

Cost!? Surely a high res image is better than a low res image? Agreed, but what is the cost of transmitting a 16mp image, or a 30 second 1080p video? A 16MP image is roughly 5MB, one visit can require 1-10 images for example. Worst case of 10 images, that is 50MB of data. A 30 second video clip in 1080p is about 210MB (other file types may be increase file size considerably.) UHD 4K would be even bigger.

If the device is 4G compatible uploads speeds are very fast @ 8MBps, 3G considerably slower 0.4MBps, under 3G it becomes a big issue. 4G would take about 30 seconds if a good connection.

210MBps video file / 0.4MBps upload speed = Nearly 9 minutes to upload. That assumes a solid constant connection for the full nine minutes. Driving to/from jobs means the signal will strengthen/weaken or stop altogether.

Why Capture High Resolution Images

The purpose of real-time mobile applications is to receive the results back in real-time, no delays, immediate billing cycles customer records instantly updated etc. If working in large cities with a good 4G presence this may work fine, if uploading images over Wi-Fi only this is also a solution, but not real-time in the majority of cases.

Consider if a 16mp image is actually required. Would a 5mp image suffice? On a PDF report to the customer the image will be scaled down anyway. Smaller file sizes improve the mobile connection speed and increase the probability of real-time communication, as well as greatly reducing the storage requirements on the back-end.

How Mobile Devices Capture High Resolution ImagesGet in touch to book a webinar or meeting about Windows based enterprise mobility devices.

Seven Key Enterprise Mobility IT Trends for 2014

Seven Key Enterprise Mobility IT Trends for 2014

Seven Key Enterprise Mobility IT Trends for 2014

Its the time of the year when we take a look into our crystal ball and consider what will be the seven key enterprise mobility IT trends for 2014.

How many of these that we identified for 2013 did you see during the year?

We are looking for trends that are likely to prove key in helping you figure out if you can generate a return on investment for your Enterprise Mobility projects.

 1. Shorter Replacement Cycles

Traditional sales pitch for an enterprise grade rugged device involves a replacement cycle of 3- 5 years based on the premise of a superior TCO and being able to repair the unit long term.

This proposition will start to become outmoded for many buyers who are used to 24 month re-fresh and a faster moving product life. Out of contract cost of repair is not dropping as traditional device manufactures try and make up margin by selling repair services.

2. Tablets and iPads.

If you just landed on Earth you would be forgiven for thinking that Apple invented tablet computing in 2010. In fact whilst the iPad has shipped in the millions rugged enterprise grade tablets had been around for years before that. Apple continues to lose market share but is happy being the premium product especially for C Level types. Is the iPad a tablet or some sort of entertainment portal – who cares. Devices have become lighter and more manageable meaning that users in organisations of all sizes are now just as comfortable with 7″ to 10″ screen formats than with a handheld or PDA form factor. In the UK IDC estimates that 25% of tablets shipped between July and September were under £120 ($190) and it expects this part of the market to grow over the next few years.

Expect to see more people looking to use more larger format tablets and more apps more often for enterprise tasks whatever the brand or OS.

3. R.I.P. Windows Mobile

Is this the year more enterprise mobility deployments go out on Android rather than Windows Mobile? Android is attacking the space from all angles and according to IDC accounts for 81% of all Smartphone shipments. That is quite a wave for Enterprise Mobility to dodge even though Apple alone accounts for 56% of the profit in the sector.

Watch out for more Android and innovative products like the Intermec CN51 which can be “upgraded” to Android in the future.

4. Rugged Android Device Battles

It’s over before it started. More rugged enterprise mobile Android units will enter the market . At the moment they seem to be happy slugging it out on price. Clearly this cannot last and for some vendors this could be a quickly deflating bubble.

New players may well start to be become dominant amid the beginning of a shake out in traditional vendors as only the fittest and most innovative will survive this.

5. Bring Your Own Device

Yawn… I hear you think not another mention about BYOD.  Whatever the hype more companies have been organising their HR and security policies to suit a deployment. Perhaps they are spurred on by Gartner predicting that 38% of surveyed CIOs will cease to provide personal IT devices to their employees by 2016.  But is it worth it? Perhaps not, one piece of research by Nucleus explained how BYOD would actually increase costs without providng any tangible benefits.

No matter what the cost many will find the approach compelling enough to fudge the numbers to fit their scenario. More companies will be doing BYOD trials and one will surely try it to impose it on blue collar workers.  After all its far too hip to go away.

6. Even More Wi-Fi

An IDC report describes how in spite of its relative maturity the enterprise WLAN market continues to go up with revenues growing at a 20% rate in recent years. Reports indicate Cisco having a solid @55% market share primary loser seems to be Motorola Solutions.

Two factors continue to drive growth in WLAN deployments. The added oomph given by all those BYOD users hooking on to corporate Wi-Fi with their iPad’s and Android devices. Also cellular operators will be looking to add more enterprise grade Wi-Fi provision to their networks and value added offerings.

7. Secure Mobile File Sharing

By giving white collar users mobile access to secure collaboration and file sharing, enterprises can boost business productivity and organizational agility. However, IT departments need to ensure that mobile file sharing never puts at risk the security of an organisation’s data.

As Keith Hall of Accellion comments,  “While “anytime, anywhere” might sound like a pipe dream that can never truly be fulfilled, we really mean it. Users have to be able to securely access any enterprise content they need, whenever needed from any type of device. And then edit the data, share it, save it – whatever is required for the task at hand. That’s mobile productivity at its finest and secure file sharing solutions will be at the center of this trend to watch”.

The Wildcards

How could we leave out Near Field Communication – NFC? Does it have a future in the mainstream? With more Android based devices being used in Enterprise Mobility expect to see more of this in a number of apps starting with proof of delivery.

Optical Character Recognition – OCR. Reading text is a great alternative to reading barcodes or RFID tags. There are plenty of human readable applications that could benefit from this approach.

Seven Key Enterprise Mobility IT Trends for 2014

We can bring our crystal ball to your office to discuss the seven key enterprise mobility IT trends for 2014 that may impact your project.

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Revisited Android in Enterprise Mobility ? Part 2

Revisited Android in Enterprise Mobility ? Part 2

We covered the basics of  Android for Enterprise Mobility in part one.  This was not meant as a rant against Android but to point out that in the enterprise market stability and longevity are important features of an OS that underpin the supportablity of a deployment. In this post – Revisited Android in Enterprise Mobility we will look into this a little further.

Whilst Android is getting there with many enterprise mobility issues it is coming from the mass adoption by indivuals and carries some interesting baggage. Bottom line is that a device with an Android OS can be an excellent unit when used for the in the right circumstances.

Android in Enterprise Mobility
Android Fragmentation from the OpenSignal Study

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fragmentation of the many various versions of the Android OS each with different capabilities has come about by the very open source nature of the platform and its incrediable popularity in the consumer market. Open Signal studied this in some detail and the results are quite revealing.

Android Versions

An explaination of the different versions in detail.

Most people with an Android phone are at least on OS 2.1 – Eclair or greater.  Versions of above 2.1:

  • 2.2 – Froyo
  • 2.3 – Gingerbread
  • 3.0 – Honeycomb
  • 4.0 – Ice-cream Sandwich
  • 4.1 – Jelly Bean
  • 4,2 – Jelly Bean

As with just about any OS the later the version the greater improved are the features but which one do you choose for your app?  Things are further complicated when consumer hardware providers add their own custom layer to differentiate between the competitors. Differing OS versions will require different APIs. If you can access the camera on a Samsung unit, it doesn’t necessarily mean you’ll be able to do the same on your HTC. Even the most experienced device estate managers have found upgrading from one version to a later one can be a tough task. And that’s before you get to BYOD.

Do you make your application native or use a web browser? are all your devices using the same web browser with the same HTML standard?

Screen Size and Keyboard

In a recent tweet Derek Kessler listed all 27 of the screen sizes currently available in the Samsung range. Interestingly Apple iOS screen sizes numbered only 4.

Data input is usually an area most people overlook. Android devices generally use a capacitive screen meaning finger touch only. The obviously causes problems if the user is wearing gloves or has dirty hands. Where a stylus can be used to pinpoint a drop down list, highlight damage on a photo or enter a signature this all becomes difficult when using finger touch.

Android devices have differing screen resoultions and maximize screen estate using an on screen keyboard. But this means application space is reduced on screen when the keyboard is present. Text input can be slow with misspellings common. Windows Mobile Devices designed for the blue collar market can come with a physical keyboard for rapid data entry.

 Scanning

Barcode scanning in another issue. On Windows Mobile units scanners are built into the unit. On Android units you can buy additional handheld scanner connected via Bluetooth. or use the camera. A camera’s primary function is to take photos/video so asking it to scan barcodes in higher volume applications can be painfully slow…..

On a side note – How many games/apps are there for a Windows Mobile device that user can download? Maybe a handful is the answer and the user has to search the internet to find the cab file install. How many games/apps are there Android that a user can download? Thousands! Of course you can lock down an Android device using SOTI device management but this is one factor to consider.

If you have an application which is basic to use with lots of drop downs and limited text input it may work very well on Android. For more complex applications I’d strongly recommend considering your Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) options before buying am inexpensive consumer device for your roll-out.

Do not let the fragmentation of the Android OS put you off using it for your enterprise mobility project. Get in touch to discuss.

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Android Devices for Enterprise Mobility ? Part 1

Android Devices for Enterprise Mobility ? Part 1

Original Android Artwork by Dan Morrill
Original Android Artwork by Dan Morrill

A continual question we get asked at MobileWorxs is “Since I can buy several Android devices for enterprise mobility for the cost of a single Windows based rugged mobile surely to do so is a no brainer?”

Well maybe it is but perhaps it is not quite so clear cut as I’ll explain in this first of 2 posts about Android devices for Enterprise Mobility.

 

 

 

Not to dismiss Android units from the start they are extremely popular in the consumer world and becoming more so in the Enterprise market due to BYOD (Bring Your Own Device). Units are well priced which is attracting a wider business audience. As a consumer smart phone they are excellent with thousands of app’s available to do 101 useful and 1101 pointless things. The open nature of Android means users can take full control of the OS and user all the device features.

If you drop and damage an Android smartphone you can just buy another and it will still be cheaper then a rugged PDA. This is true but over how many times? and it is somewhat dependent on the environment and the availability of the same model you just smashed up.

Everyone has dropped there own mobile phone and it bounces and continues to work.  Generally your mobile phone spends most of its life in your pocket or on your desk. When used in real world blue collar applications the device is use for the task in hand, thrown into the van foot well, carried on a shoulder strap or shoved into a vehicle cradle. This means the device could get knocked or dropped easily 20 times a day.

When using your mobile device throughout the day you are far more likely to accidentally knock or drop the unit as opposed to your personal mobile phone safe in your pocket or held to your ear. Battery life of personal mobile phones isn’t what it used to be, battery technology although advancing hasn’t kept up with the demands of 3G Wi-Fi and Bluetooth all being switched on all the time. If you use a device continually throughout the day you’ll need to charge it more often.

Charging

This means you’ll need a robust charger or in vehicle dock when driving from job to job. Unfortunately these accessories are only consumer grade. Plugging and unplugging leads will reduce life span or the charger and device. This is why enterprise devices have numerous rugged accessories so devices can be jammed into a cradle and pulled out without damaging either part.

Theft

Damage is one issue, theft is another. You don’t see many people with an MC9500 down the pub texting a friend. This is because they are not desirable they are tools for work. Revert to an Ipad or the latest Samsung Galaxy 4 – everybody wants one because they look cool the latest gadget to have. This is a sad state of affairs but unfortunately it does happen.

This isn’t to say the current crop of Android devices are not good. They are more then capable if used in the correct way. A manager/merchandiser/salesman etc can all use an Android device or even Ipad/Iphone without too many issues. They are not in an environment where the device is very likely to get knocked or dropped.

Changing Times

Manufacturers that have traditionally built Windows Mobile equipment for the line of business market are starting to bring out Android based devices. In the past these companies have used Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) as a reason why users should buy rugged devices and they may well end up using the sales argument here. After all it’s just another OS and if you are deploying thousands of the same unit it does actually pay to be able to fix it rather than scrap it. However what they are not used to combating is the functionality and price point of a smartphone so watch this space.

Of course the key point is that there is no point buying any sort of mobile technology without having thought through how it will resolve an issue with a business problem. So do this first !

In the short term expect to see more Android devices for enterprise mobility like the Mini Tablet Motorola ET1 and more traditional smartphone shape Handheld x1. Both are fine units and run Android but each has different versions of the OS…more of that next time.
Using Android Devices for Enterprise Mobility

Photos Using Your Entire Enterprise Mobile Data Plan?

Photos Using Your Entire Enterprise Mobile Data Plan?

Guest Post by Timothy C B Cox with some great advice on getting the best out of your enterprise mobile data plan.

Are Photos Using Your Entire Enterprise Mobile Data Plan?

Fact: Network providers want to sell you their most expensive data plan.

Fact: Network providers like Facebook, Twitter, Instagram Vine and other apps that push photos into their cloud with the best quality image.  But your enterprise photos need to get back into your system as fast as possible to be of value.

 

Uploading images to your cloud can make up a high percentage of your data plan. So understanding this better can help reduce your data plan and reduce costs!

So why send an 8 megapixel image when a 1mp image (or less) will do the job!

Your enterprise mobile photos need to be of good enough quality to do the job but small enough to avoid long upload times and excessive data plan usage.  There is no need to use the highest resolution photo available.

A single transaction typically involves more than one photo, so the problem is compounded by the need to complete the work and being about to transmit all the information in a timely manner.

Make sure the image fits the space on users screen.

Capturing the information is only the start.  Once the image (and other data) has hit your cloud or other systems the image will need to be viewed by others who are using different systems.

These different systems may need to display the image in different ways. Be sure to establish the best common width and height of your photo.  This will reduce the need for post-processing of the image and any subsequent problems displaying the image for other users on different Windows Mobile Android or iOS devices.

Make sure you have the handle on picture quality.

There are many image types you can use, but without prior consideration you may choose a format not best suited for your solution.

There are many formats with JPEG being the most common image, but if you want to take photos of forms or drawings may not be suitable. Which one ?

How much quality do you want to retain?

You can take the photo at the maximum resolution the mobile device is capable of then reduce the image size and perhaps change the file format for transmitting.  You can then retain the high quality image on your mobile device if it is needed later.

Note: You will need to purchase extra flash storage for these full size images.

Make sure you control the image size

Key Point: Images are an important part of your mobile system especially if being used to enforce compliance. Once you have decided on the image size you will need to stop anyone from changing your settings.  Buy software to perform MDM Mobile Device Management and lock down your mobile devices preventing users from changing all of your device settings.

Photos Using Your Entire Enterprise Mobile Data Plan?

Timothy C B Cox Mobile Workforce Strategy Consultant based in Dubai. Get in touch with Tim through Linkedin

Are Photos Using Your Entire Enterprise Mobile Data Plan ?

Call us to discuss how we can help keep you in the picture and ensure your enterprise mobility project addresses your key business issues.

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New Motorola MC45 for Enterprise Mobility

New Motorola MC45 for Enterprise Mobility

If you are looking for a rugged handheld take a look at the Motorola MC45 for Enterprise Mobility.

Motorola MC45 for Enterprise Mobility

 

MC45 joins Motorola’s packed line up of rugged devices that use Windows Mobile 6.5 as a platform for delivering line of businss applications to field based workers.

Sheldon Safir, Director of global solutions marketing at Motorola Solutions introduced the unit by describing it as having “aggressive pricing for full functionality”

MC45 ships with all the usual components you might expect from the major manufacturer in this sector. 3,080mAH Li-Ion battery a 600MHz chip with 256MB of RAM. Wi-Fi and WWAN along with a 1D scanner and numeric keypad.

 

What is it For ?

  1. Provides the Motorola Solutions channel with a weapon to fight off the unending stream of no name brand product coming out of the far east.
  2. Motorola have shifted huge quantities of their ES400 entry level EDA since it’s launch in 2010. They have no doubt noticed that this price/performance point is a real hit with enterprise users trying to justify buying a rugged handheld instead of a smartphone. MC45 is more of the same.
  3. Most enterprise mobility deployments still use Windows Mobile so the MC45 will help keep users on side until Windows 8 shows up and Android becomes more popular in this sector.

MC45 Appeal

  1. Great total cost of ownership proposition especially when wound up with a no fault maintenace contract.
  2. Size – Compared to the rugged stalwarts of the Motorola Solutions line up MC45 is larger than an ES400 but smaller than the MC67 and MC75 this will appeal to a large number of users.
  3. Keyboard – Most line of business apps need numeric data entry, the unit comes with a numeric keyboard with shifted Alpha capability
  4. Real 1D laser scanning. Still the best option for scan intensive applications.

Motorola MC45 for Enterprise Mobility

Find out more about the MC45. Or read these comments from Rugged PC Review.

MobileWorxs can help you navigate your way through the device selection process and help you deliver an enterprise mobility project that adds value to your business.

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Windows 8 in the Mobile Enterprise

Windows 8 release – Impact On the Mobile Enterprise

Windows is Windows right!? Each version has had some level of backwards compatibility so you can run an app built for XP on Vista or 7, or in the mobile enterprise Windows Mobile 5 on 6.5, give or take a few tweaks depending how the application was designed. Windows 8 will be the same?

Microsoft Windows 8At the moment it’s difficult to know exactly how Windows 8 will perform, especially when looking at the mobile market for WOA (Windows on ARM), which is mobile devices running Windows 8 on ARM processors. This is because the hardware isn’t available yet. Manufacturers are hard at work creating hardware from scratch up just for WOA.

The devices themselves will share a wide amount of commonality with the full Windows 8 Desktop OS, bridging the gap between the two, but with the aim of the best of both worlds. That is combining the reduced footprint of Mobile with the features of a desktop OS. But the issue here is there will be no third party desktop applications. Applications have to go through the store, which become Metro (design language Windows 8 is based upon).

Rugged PDAs running Windows Mobile 6.5 may have to stay on Windows Mobile 6.5 for a while longer. Embedded versions of Windows Phone 7/8 are in the Microsoft road map later in the year but with no release dates the Mobile Enterprise market may have to wait. Not confirmed, but Windows may move away from the Compact Framework in the next release. Until Microsoft do confirm this there is little point worrying about it, but if they do it may mean challenges for a huge host of major players in the Mobile Enterprise.

Looking more at the Windows 8 platform as a whole, it is a cross device platform all linked via a Windows Live account. This means your “Live” content should be accessible from any Windows 8 device. Keeping the same OS layout over multiple devices will mean overall ease of use when switches between form factor.

Windows 8 32-bit & 64-bit based offerings on Intel/AMD will be released around October. Intel are currently working on optimising their processors to work with Windows 8 tablet machines.

Applications that were previously installed on Windows 7 can be installed in Windows 8 using the desktop – There are two types of GUI, the metro style block apps and the standard Windows Desktop. If already using Windows 7, a jump to Windows 8 shouldn’t be too much of a struggle. It should be an improvement.

At the moment it seems the Mobile Enterprise won’t be affected until the new release of Windows Mobile is launched. Microsoft’s goal appears to be taking some of the tablet market Apple & Samsung have dominated.

The key question is: As Android starts to become a consideration in the Enterprise market, is it worth waiting to see what Microsoft come out with and stay on Windows Mobile 6.5?

Mobile Application Development Platform Vs Traditional Coding – Deployment

Mobile Application Development Platform Vs Traditional Coding – Deployment

Use Apps on Any Device

Implementing a project from a written specification using traditional coding methods like C# and VB.NET is one issue that we can overcome by using our Mobile Application Development Platform. Deploying a project is the next problem !

 

 

Deploying applications when using coding methods like C#, and some other available platform tools requires the compiled application along with all drivers like barcode readers, 3G comms camera and mobile printers to be manually loaded onto the device. This isn’t necessarily an issue for the initial deployment but what happens when the application requires an update? The customer purchases new hardware? Or updates the operating system?

In almost all cases the application need to be edited by the software house re-tested and then the devices need to come in from the field to be refreshed with the updated software. This takes time and eats resources not to mention losing money while the devices are no in the field and takes control away from the customer. There are additional tools available to assist with remotely deploying files to a device but they can be expensive and the software cannot be in use while the update takes place.

This is another area where MobileFrame excels. Our mobile application development platform like all other software does require an initial install but includes all of the drivers required. Once the software is installed the device can stay in the field. When the user logs in any applications and data assigned to the user will automatically be synchronized with the device. Because the customer can be trained how to use MobileFrame they can create edit and maintain applications in house. These updated or new applications can then be instantly deployed and managed to the devices in the field in real time over 3G/Wi-Fi. The next time the user selects the application the updated version will be loaded.

Simple tasks such as changing a logo altering the layout of report print out of a PDF adding a column to a table can all be implemented tested and deployed in a matter of minutes. Compare this to traditional methods and the same change will no longer be a ‘simple’ change.

The key question is: As the business grows and changes, there will need to be updates to the mobile application. What level of cost and downtime is acceptable?